Old Fire Truck

HISTORY OF THE

FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT

ANSWERING THE ALARM

Station 211 Fire Headquarters

Station 211

Address:

Station 211 - Fire Headquarters
6048 Morris Road
Fairfield Township, Ohio 45011

Main Phone: 513.887.4402

Fax: 513.887.2705

Fairfield Township Fire Station 211 (Fire Headquarters)

Station 211 was built in 2000.

line of trucks with plows on them

Household Hazardous Waste Drop Off and Freon Collection Programs

2022 Zoning Cases

FTZC22-2C

A0300-172-000-002 

Applicant: First Church of God of Hamilton Ohio

Notice in Paper

Application

BPUD Plan Set

Design Guidelines

Butler County Planning Commission Resolution

Staff Report

 

 

Report a nuisance property. 

This includes high grass and vegetation, junk vehicles, and trash in yards.

 

Once reported in Gov Pilot the concern is shared to the Zoning Department.  The process begins with an inspection by the Zoning Inspector where pictures will be taken and stored to file.  Attempts will be made to knock on doors or leave courtesy notices via door hangers.  If voluntary compliance is not achieved than official notices begin and a violation property can be brought before the Board of Trustees for resolution.  If a resolution is passed with no compliance the Township is legally authorized to take action to repair violations and then assess taxes.  In certain cases the Law Director is needed and cases are taken to court.

 

For immediate concerns please contact Nick Armstrong at narmstrong@fairfieldtwp.org or 513-785-2293

 

*Please note that the goal of nuisance resolution is to foster a spirit of cooperation with residents and property owners.  Maintained properties benefit the entire community and assist in property value for all.  The Zoning Department makes every attempt to work with and alongside all residents.

2022 Zoning Cases

FTZA22-3V

A0300-210-000-039 known as 3201 Princeton Road

Applicant: Kimley Horn

Case to be heard by the FTZA on February 24, 2022, at 7:00 PM

Notice of Public Hearing

Application

Applicant Plans

Staff Report

 

FTZC21-3C Final PUD Review

A0300-023-000-066, 063, & 083 known as Walden Springs

Applicant: NVR 

Final PUD Plan to be reviewed by the Board of Trustees on March 8, 2022, at 7:00 PM

Notice of Meeting

Executed Application

FPUD Submittal Letter

Indian Meadows Entrance

Creekside Entrance

Landscaping Plan

Declaration of Covenants

 

FTZA22-2V (Passed)

A0300-144-000-144 known as 3027 Cyprus Hill Drive

Applicant Peggy Gruenemeier

Case to be heard by the FTZA on January 27, 2022, at 7:00 PM

Notice of Public Hearing

 

FTZC22-1C

A0300-025-000-079 known as 2860 Menards Blvd

Applicant: Langan Engineering & Environmental Services

Plans to be reviewed by the Trustees on April 12, 2022, at 7:00 PM

Notice in Paper

Application

Applicant Architectural Plans

Applicant Civil Plans

Staff Report

 

2022 Monthly Reports

Click on Month to View Reports

January 2022

February 2022

March 2022

April 2022

May 2022

June 2022

July 2022

Fairfield Township Appeals and Commission Boards (FTZA & FTZC)

For a LIST OF RESPONSIBILITIES by Board Click Here

For a LIST OF MEMBERS with terms Click Here

For a LIST OF MEETING DATES please Click Here

See below for additional information.

Julie Vonderhaar - Administrator 

Mrs. Vonderhaar has worked at Fairfield Township since 2014. She can be reached at jvonderhaar@fairfieldtwp.org or by calling 513-203-4441.

Education
McAuley High School, Xavier University, MBA from University of Cincinnati

 

Chuck Goins - Assistant Administrator 

Mr. Goins has worked at Fairfield Township since 2017 and is a resident of Fairfield Township.  He can be reached at cgoins@fairfieldtwp.org or by calling 513-785-2266.

Shelly Schultz

Shelly Schultz - Fiscal Officer

Address:     7881 Jessies Way

Occupation: Certified Public Accountant

Contact:      sschultz@fairfieldtwp.org

Education
University of Cincinnati, Bachelors of Business Administration in Accounting 1996, CPA License 2002

Experience/qualifications:  
Resident of Fairfield Township, former President and Treasurer of Fairfield Elementary PTC, Member of Ohio Township Association, Treasurer for Building Fairfield's Future, Treasurer of Avalon Station HOA, Twenty-plus years of accounting experience.

Main concerns for Township:  
Fiscal responsibility and stability for the Fairfield Township community and its residents.

2021 Zoning Cases

 

FTZC21-1C Final PUD Johnsons Grocery (PASSED)

Application

Site, building, lighting and landscaping plans

Staff Report

 

FTZC21-2C Proposed Timber Trails Development (PASSED)

Legal Notice

Application

Applicant Presentation

Staff Report

Rezone Plat

Legal Description

Survivorship Deed

Preliminary PUD Plan

Landscape Plan

 

FTCZC21-3C Proposed Waldon Springs Development (PASSED)

Legal Notice

Application

Applicant Presentation

Staff Report

Preliminary PUD Plan

Entrances

Landscape Plan

Site Rendering

 

FTZC21-4C Proposed Zoning Text Amendment regarding parking for commercial and recreational vehicles (NOT PASSED)

Legal Notice

Resolution Initiating Zoning Amendment Process

Existing Zoning Text Amendment

Proposed Zoning Text Amendment

 

FTZC21-5C Final PUD Leesman/Tropical Smoothie (PASSED)

Application

Civil plans

Landscaping and lighting plans

Building Elevations

Staff Report

Zoning Department

Address:
6032 Morris Road
Hamilton, OH 45011  

Phone: 513-785-2266  

Zoning Administrator: Chuck Goins  Email

 

The Planning Department’s primary function is to plan for future growth and development by participating in the development and implementation of short and long-range planning documents. Additionally, the department also administers the Zoning Resolution and issues hundreds of residential and commercial permits every year. Department Staff also work to enforce the zoning code by issuing violations to properties in noncompliance. Finally, the Planning Department actively works to forge economic development partnerships with other state, county, and local agencies with the goal of bringing new commercial and industrial development to Fairfield Township. Economic development can lead to new employment opportunities and helps to foster a dynamic local and regional economy. By effectively balancing and managing planning, zoning, and economic development activities, the Planning Department strives every day to ensure that Fairfield Township remains a great place to live, work, and play.

Our mission at the Fairfield Township Planning Department is to effectively balance and manage Planning, Zoning, and Economic Development activities to ensure that Fairfield Township remains a great place to live, work, and play.

Fairfield Township Zoning Commission

The Fairfield Township Zoning Commission consists of five members appointed by the Township Trustees. The Zoning Commission is a legislative body that reviews cases related to zone changes, Planned Unit Developments and Resolution Text Amendments.

The Zoning Commission meets the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M., as needed, at the Fairfield Township Administration building, 6032 Morris Road.

 

Current Members

 

Name: Greg Philpot

Title: Chair

Date Appointed: 1/31/2009

Term Expires: 01/31/2024

 

Name: Steve Weeks

Title: Vice-Chair

Date Appointed: 06/09/2021

Term Expires: 01/31/2026

 

Name: Michael Jodrey

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 

Term Expires: 01/31/2025

 

Name: Cheryl Leadbetter

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 05/25/2016

Term Expires: 01/31/2023

 

Name: Robert Wilking

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 12/28/2004

Term Expires: 01/31/2027

 

Name: Vacancy

Title: Alternate

Date Appointed: 

Term Expires: 01/31/2022

Resources

Resources

Fire Chief Timothy J. Thomas

Message from the Fire Chief:

The Fairfield Township Community is a fast growing area which provides a great location for the department and our members to continue to expand our response capabilities. 

The Fairfield Township Fire Department is located in Butler County Ohio. As a combination Department we provide a full service response to residents and visitors to our community. The Department currently operates from two stations. We respond to over 3000 calls for service annually. In addition to Fire and Rescue activities, the department provides Paramedic level EMS service. We cover an area of 17.5 square miles protecting over 22,000 residents and visitors enjoying activities in our community.

An active Fire Prevention Bureau provides quality fire safety education and training to the community. We also conduct fire safety and fire code compliance activities.  Members of the department serve actively on the Butler County Response Teams. This includes the Incident Management Team, Hazardous Materials, and Technical Rescue Team.  The Department is an active participant in our community. Our membership keeps involved in community programs, activities, and continues to work in partnership with our business community.

Please take a moment to look at the information contained on our web site. I would like to thank you for visiting the Fairfield Township Fire Department web site.

Chief Timothy J. Thomas Sr. OFE OFC

SINCE 1947

 The first known action by anyone was taken in the year 1898, by a group of Township residents. They met at the home of Adam Braun and organized a volunteer fire department.

They built a two wheel cart and mounted a fifty gallon cylinder tank to the cart. The cart was equipped with a hand pump, buckets, and fifty foot of hose no bigger than a modern garden hose. The new fire cart was housed in the rear of Kreiling’s Saloon. This was the beginnings of the current Fairfield Township Fire Department.

The next recorded history is in 1922 when a group of residents known as the Rosedale Improvement Association procured ten fire extinguishers. They were installed in every third house in the subdivision. This system served until 1945 when the need for more adequate fire protection could no longer be ignored. This was due to a fire in October of 1944 on Pater Avenue where several members of a family were burned to death in a structure fire.

The Fairfield and Belmont Volunteer Firemen’s Association was formed. These men worked to gather donations to purchase a fire truck. Volunteers paid an initiation fee of $10 to the association and served without pay. With donated material and men from the association working together, the first fire station was built on the corner of Tuley Road and Belmont Avenue – (This is a vacant lot today).

In 1946 the volunteers had a fire house for their newly acquired truck. The truck was a 1930 Model A Ford, which was refurbished by Fred Mullins and Ralph Kearney. It carried 1500 gallons of water. Many times the volunteers themselves paid for the oil and gas for the truck.

Ralph Kearney was appointed Chief of the Department.

Fred Mullins and Garth Day were appointed Assistant Chief of the Department.

In June of 1947 it became apparent that this small organization could not provide adequate protection for the entire township. A meeting was called by Harold Linz to discuss the possibility of passing a bond issue to fund a township fire department. The trustees being John McGreevy, Carl Schiering, and A.B. McCormick agreed to place the issue on the ballot that November. The bond issued passed by an overwhelming majority.

In 1948 a 500 gallon International Fire Truck was purchased by the township and housed in a new fire house built on Tylersville Road on the corner of Exeter Street. This fire house is still in use today.

Station 212

Station 212

Address:

6911 Gilmore Road
Fairfield Township, Ohio 45011

Phone: 513.887.4404

Fairfield Township Fire Station 212

Station 212 was built in 1948 and subsequently remodeled in 1964 and 1970 and was located at 2659 Tylersville Road. In May of 2019 a ribbon cutting was held to officially open a new Station 212 on Gilmore Road.

Fire and emergency service departments all across the nation are struggling with increasing demands for service coupled with reduced funding. In order to respond to these increasing demands and provide more services to the community, the Fairfield Township Fire Department has established a Fire Corps program and is seeking volunteers to help.

Fire Corps creates opportunities for citizens to give back to their community by providing non-emergency assistance to their local fire/EMS department. From creating websites to maintaining vehicles, promoting life safety education or offering administrative assistance, you can help your community become safer and better prepared for natural disasters, terrorist threats and other emergencies.

“This program will allow the department to continue meeting the public education needs of our community. On duty firefighters will still participate in programs, but with the addition of the Fire Corp members, a program will continue if Firefighters have to leave and respond to an emergency” said Chief Thomas.

Fire Corps, a component of the Department of Homeland Security’s Citizen Corps program, is a national grassroots effort to increase the capacity of volunteer, career and combination fire and EMS departments through the use of community volunteers. Fire Corps provides resources for departments to utilize volunteers in non-emergency roles so they can develop, implement, and sustain programs and services that will help their department meet the needs of their community.

For more information or to become a Fire Corps volunteer, contact Fairfield Township Fire Department at (513)887-4402 or visit our web site at FairfieldTwp.org. Informational Flyer 

Not all smoke detectors are the same

For many years, the motto of America’s Fire Service has been, “Smoke alarms save lives”. Smoke alarms do save lives, but the smoke alarm you have is critically important as not all smoke alarms are the same.

Current smoke alarms use two types of smoke alarm technologies: photoelectric and ionization.

Ionization smoke alarms are found in an estimated 93% of U.S homes and cost between $5.00 and $10.00. Ionization type detects changes in a local ionization field within the detection chamber resulting in the presence of smoke. This type of alarm responds faster to flaming fires.

Photoelectric smoke alarms cost between $10.00 and $15.00. The photoelectric type has a light source and detects the scattering or obscuration caused by smoke particles. This type of alarms responds faster to smoldering fires such as those ignited by cigarettes in upholstered furniture.

Duel sensor smoke detector (containing both ionization and photo electric technology) usually cost between $18.00 and $30.00 each.

A 2004 study conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology indicated that fire in today’s homes smolder longer and burn hotter and faster than what was typical when smoke detectors were first introduced a number of years ago. The NIST study also concluded that because fires could be more aggressive, the time needed to escape some type of fires has been reduced significantly from approximately seventeen (17) minutes at the time of the original study in the 1970’s to as little as three (3) minutes under certain conditions today.

Since it cannot be predicted what type of fire will start in the home, it is important that both smoldering and flaming fires are detected as quickly as possible. The best protection is to have dual sensor technology smoke alarms that incorporate both ionization/photoelectric sensors. 

Working smoke alarms need should be installed on every level of the home, outside sleeping areas and inside bedrooms

Photoelectric smoke detectors usually have the word PHOTOELECTRIC right on them. You might also see a big “P” or a blue symbol. If you don’t see any symbols chances are, it’s probably an ionization smoke detector. These alarms are sometime marked with a letter I or other symbols.

Fairfield Township Fire Department will provide smoke detectors at no cost to township residents.

Contact (513) 887-4402

Records Requests:

Public Records Law: http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/149.43

 

Fire Reports:

Contact: mschumann@fairfieldtwp.org

 

Please provide the following information.

Requestors Name:

Address of incident:

Date of Incident:

 

EMS Reports:

Contact: mschumann@fairfieldtwp.org

 

Please provide the following information.

Requestors Name:

Address of incident:

Date of Incident:

 

Law Firms – We subscribe to Chart Swap.  Please check chart swap before contacting the Fire Department. 

 

Individuals:  We follow all HIPAA laws. If you would like a copy of your own EMS Report, you need to fill out the attached form, bring it to the fire station with an official photo ID such as a driver’s license or state ID card.   We cannot release EMS reports to anyone other than the patient unless you have a Healthcare Power of Attorney.  In that case you need to come to the fire station on Morris Road so we can make a copy of the POA and attach it to the report. 

 

Request for EMS Billing should be sent to: 

Medicount Management, 10361 Spartan Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45215  

Phone 772-4465,   Fax 513-772-4464.

 

Fire Inspection Reports:

Contact: mschumann@fairfieldtwp.org

Fire inspection reports follow the same public records requests procedures as Fire Reports.

Chief Robert Chabali

Message from the Police Chief:

I want to welcome you to Fairfield Township Police Department, a full-service law enforcement agency whose mission statement, organizational values and fundamental goals are reflective of our commitment to the community and continue to guide our agency’s pursuit of professional excellence. Thank you for your interest in Fairfield Township Police Department.  

Chief Robert Chabali

Police Department

Address:
6485 Vonnie Vale Court
Hamilton, OH 45011

Non-emergency, business hours: 513-887-4406

Dispatch: 513-785-1300

Fax: 513-887-4407

Email: Police Chief rchabali@fairfieldtwp.org

Email: Police Captain dlanier@fairfieldtwp.org

Police Reports

The Records Section of the Fairfield Township Police Department is responsible for maintaining all offense reports, traffic crash reports, traffic citations, and other departmental records.

It is easiest to locate police reports by report number; however, if the report number is not known, please provide enough information to locate the report (involved person's name, incident date, incident location, etc). You may fill out the Public Records Request Form and submit it when requesting information.

Copies of reports can be obtained in any of the following ways in accordance with the Ohio Public Records Law and the Fairfield Township Public Records Policy.

Phone:     513-887-4406

Fax: 513-887-4407

Written request: Provide a self-addressed, stamped envelope

Email: policerecords@fairfieldtwp.org

In person: In the lobby

Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm

The Fairfield Township Police Department is looking for a few good men and women who have the desire to learn about law enforcement and the Fairfield Township Police Department. This ten-week program provides citizens the opportunity to learn about police department functions. Classroom discussions and hands-on demonstrations will provide attendees with a background of the department as well as familiarization with some of the many aspects of police work. Get a more in-depth look at the duties and responsibilities of a law enforcement officer.

Topics include: The Judicial System; D.A.R.E./G.R.E.A.T; Gang Awareness; Criminal and Crash Investigations; Traffic Enforcement; Police Aviation; Police K-9; Domestic Violence; Drug/Vice Operations; Firearms and Driving Simulators; and Use of Force and Weapons Familiarization.

Academy members also have the opportunity to participate in the ride-along program and to join the Citizen Police Academy Alumni Association. All academies meet in the police department's training room once per week from 6:30pm to 9:30pm, for 10 weeks.

You can complete and print the application here and deliver it during business hours or mail it to Anita Snyder, or contact Anita Snyder at policerecords@fairfieldtwp.org.

Note: Applicants must be at least 18 years of age. The police department does not train Citizen Police Academy participants to be a police officer, but to educate and inform citizens.

Crime Prevention

Please, do not leave any items of value in your vehicle.  Theft from vehicles is a nation-wide, ongoing problem, and it is difficult to catch the thieves when they strike randomly in the shadows of the night.  If a thief is arrested, they tend to strike again once released.  This is not a problem isolated to Fairfield Township, but across the nation.  Even if you lock your car, do not leave items of value in it - especially in plain sight - as thieves may break a window or jimmy their way in.

Also, take the time to document your valuables and other property. Print the Household Inventory Form and keep in a safe place for your records.

D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) and G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education and Training) are school-based, law enforcement officer-instructed classroom curriculum's with the primary focus of educating children and providing them with the skills they need to avoid involvement in drugs, gangs, and violence.

The police department currently provides the D.A.R.E. and G.R.E.A.T. curriculum to those students attending Fairfield North and Fairfield East Elementary Schools.

For more information on the DARE Association of Ohio, click here.

Along with the township's growth has come an increase in call volume and cases assigned for follow-up investigation. If you have information regarding a crime, please contact the police department at 513-887-4406.

Check out the Tri-County Crime Stoppers website.

The Fairfield Township Police Department has assigned an investigator to the BURN Unit (Butler Undercover Regional Narcotics Task Force) - a unit of specialized investigators that focus on drug enforcement. Various agencies work in partnership with the Sheriff's office, resulting in an experienced and qualified unit built on teamwork.

Uniformed Patrol

The uniformed patrol function of the Fairfield Township Police Department is in operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and is the most visible section of the police department. Officers that are assigned to this section primarily patrol in marked police cars, although at times they may be seen patrolling using other effective methods, such as foot patrol around business districts and patrolling on bicycle. The police department operates three different shifts, each having an assigned sergeant and patrol officers, allowing for adequate personnel and supervision.

The patrol section interacts with the community on a continuous basis and assigned officers have the primary duty of responding to calls for police service, conducting preliminary investigations of offenses, following up on applicable investigations and enforcing the laws of the State of Ohio. Patrol officers also have the responsibility of apprehending offenders, preventing crime through deterrence and education, and maintaining positive relationships with the community.

The Fairfield Township Police Department takes seriously all complaints regarding the service provided by the department and the conduct of its members.  The department will accept and address all complaints of misconduct in accordance with policy and applicable federal, state, and local law, local rules, and the requirements of any collective bargaining agreement.

It is also the policy of this department to ensure that the community can report misconduct without concern for reprisal and retaliation.

All complaints will be courteously accepted by any department member and promptly given to the appropriate supervisor. Although written complaints are preferred, a complaint may also be filed orally, either in person or by telephone. Although not required, we encourage complainants to file complaints in person so that proper identification, signatures, photographs, or physical evidence may be obtained as necessary.

Public Works Department

Address:
6897 Gilmore Road
Hamilton, OH  45011

Phone: 513-785-3663

Public Works Director: Jeff Bennett

Township Road List

Road list.

Address:
Butler County Engineer's Office
1921 Fairgrove (SR 4)
Hamilton, OH 45011

Phone: 513-867-5744

  • LIBERTY-FAIRFIELD ROAD
  • MILLIKIN ROAD
  • PRINCETON ROAD (FROM THE BY-PASS 4 EAST BOUND)
  • HAMILTON-MASON ROAD
  • TYLERSVILLE ROAD
  • CANAL ROAD (BETWEEN CAMPBELL AVE AND HEADGATES ROAD)
  • HEADGATES ROAD

 

Address:
Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT)/State of Ohio
Butler Garage
4560 Kyles Station Road
Liberty Township, OH 45011

Phone: 513-863-6609

  • SR 4 (HAMILTON-MIDDLETOWN ROAD)
  • SR 4 By-Pass
  • SR 129

Ways Residents Can Help

The Public Works Department is currently staffed by seven employees who maintain over 220 lane miles of Township roads.  In order to assist them during snow events, the following is advised:

  • Park all vehicles in your driveway to keep the roadways clear for the snow plows
  • Only drive if necessary
  • Exercise patience

Typically the snow plows will clear major roadways first, followed by secondary residential roads and finally cul-de-sacs.  When able, F-350's will also be deployed to clear cul-de-sacs more quickly.

If there are any questions or concerns during snow events, please contact Julie Vonderhaar at jvonderhaar@fairfiedtwp.org or Dianne French at dfrench@fairfieldtwp.org 785-2247.

Plow in Snow

Resources

Sidewalk Policy

Please contact the Service Department at jbennett@fairfieldtwp.org if there are questions regarding your sidewalk.

park shelter

Township Parks

Click on the links below to view the annual reports.

2020 Annual Report

2019 Annual Report

2018 Annual Report

 

In 1996, Fairfield Township established a Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) with the city of Hamilton to provide a source of funding for infrastructure improvements. In 2004, an amendment was made to the JEDD which incorporated additional areas., thus increasing funds while protecting from annexation.

Infrastructure improvements help promote and sustain commercial development within the area. In today's environment, local governments (Townships) are expected to fund a much greater share of infrastructure projects due to lack of available funds at the state and federal levels. A JEDD allows for townships to partner with a municipality (or municipalities) to corporate an income tax on a specific area of the township

The income tax percentage collected for the Hamilton /Township JEDD is 2%. Fairfield Township is excited about the shared benefits of the JEDD including high-quality economic expansion, increased employment opportunities, and improved access to goods and services for area businesses and residents. The JEDD agreement exemplifies regional cooperation and local initiatives. We believe that the JEDD area is a strong and viable economic engine for Fairfield Township, Butler County, and all of southwest Ohio.

The link above explains both the original JEDD and the amendment and includes maps of the JEDD areas.

In 1998 and 1999 Fairfield Township created two Tax Increment Financing (TIF) districts. In 2017 through 2020 three additional TIF areas were established.

Tax increment financing (TIF) is a public financing method that is used as a subsidy for redevelopment, infrastructure, and other community-improvement projects.  A TIF captures increases in taxable assessed value in an allocation area and the revenue generated from that development (or Growth) is used to finance public improvements.

Please view the links for information and maps related to the TIF areas.

FD Old Fire Truck
Figure 1 – 1947 International Pumper

The trustees appointed Fred Mullins as the first Fire Chief of the township.

The township has only had eight fire chiefs since 1948.

Fred Mullins served for 8 years as Chief. He was followed in order by Robert Sroufe, David Downie, Harold Niemoller, William Hieb, James Wargo, David Downie , and Timothy Thomas hired in 2012..

In August of 2006, David Downie after serving as Volunteer Fire Chief for 20 years was hired as the first full time Fire Chief in Fairfield Township.

The firemen’s association survived the township taking over the operation of the fire department. It continued for many years as a sort of social organization within the fire department. The association hired new firemen, voted for their choice of fire chief as needed and raised money to purchase items for the department that the township did not have the money purchase. These were funded through dances, raffles, and other forms of fund raising.

Firemen applied for acceptance to the department to the association and the association voted to hire or refuse the application. Three no votes were needed to turn a candidate down for the department.

The association also held several social events throughout the year for the members. The Christmas party was a favorite among the member’s children, as Santa Claus arrived on the back of the fire truck with a present for all the children. Halloween was another fun time for the membership. The members dressed in costume and competed in games. A spring picnic was held at a near by park with all the usual food and games. With changes in society and the lack of interest by the membership, the association eventually became out dated and brought about its end.

The township took over the purchase of all equipment and the hiring of all personnel. Even though the association did not last, for many years it was the backbone of the fire department. This is true not only in Fairfield Township, but in most of the volunteer departments in Butler County. There are still some associations working today at some of the smaller departments who do not have the funds they need to run their departments.

 In 1951 the township trustees realized the need for additional equipment. A 500 gallon GMC pumper was purchased and housed at Symmes Corner in what now is Fairfield City. This became known as fire house #2, with fire house #1 being on Tylersville Road.

Mission Statement

The members of the Fairfield Township Police Department strive to provide excellent service and work in partnership with our community to enhance the quality of life and safety to all.

Background Checks / Fingerprinting

Local background checks can be completed through the police department's record section and is comprised of Fairfield Township police records only. Persons needing checks through other agencies will have to go through that individual agency for any other necessary records checks.

The State of Ohio (BCI) no longer accepts rolled fingerprint cards unless it meets one of the permitted exceptions. We do not currently provide for electronic fingerprint/background checks; however, for a list of locations that do, please refer to the Ohio Attorney General's website

Neighborhood Watch

Nationally, the ratio of police officers to citizens is approximately two officers for every 1,000 citizens. Not all of these officers are on patrol duty at once and some also fill other roles within the department. Therefore, the police department relies on the additional eyes and ears of its community to report suspicious activity and in providing information to assist in the fight against crime. In order to facilitate this, and in cooperation with the Fairfield Township Police Department, citizens are shown how to recognize suspicious or criminal activities and report them to the police department. Note, a Neighborhood Watch Community is not a group of vigilantes or lawless people taking the law into their own hands, but citizens working together toward a common goal - a safe neighborhood. It also allows for the members of Neighborhood Watch communities to become familiar with others in their neighborhood.

For further information about a Neighborhood Watch Program or to inquire about setting one up for your neighborhood, email the coordinator, or contact the police department at 513-887-4406.

Traffic Complaints and Speed Trailer

Our goal is to promote safety through education and enforcement. This includes enforcing traffic laws, investigating traffic crashes, and being visible by patrolling the roadways within the township in order to deter traffic violations and reduce traffic crashes.

If you would like to report a special traffic-related concern, or are interested in having the department speed trailer set up at a particular location, email Traffic Complaints, or, contact us during business hours at 513-887-4406.

Complaint Classifications

Personnel complaints shall be classified in one of the following categories:

Informal – A matter in which the supervisor is satisfied that appropriate action has been taken by a supervisor of rank greater than the accused member.

Formal – A matter in which a supervisor determines that further action is warranted.  Such complaints may be investigated by a supervisor of rank greater than the accused member or referred to the Chief's Designee, depending on the seriousness and complexity of the investigation.

Incomplete – A matter in which the complaining party either refuses to cooperate or becomes unavailable after diligent follow-up investigation. At the discretion of the assigned supervisor or the Chief's Designee, such matters may be further investigated depending on the seriousness of the complaint and the availability of sufficient information.

The Public Works Department is responsible for maintaining all township roads, right of ways, and traffic control signs. The Department plows snow and spreads salt as needed on all township roads. During fair weather, Public Works maintains the grass within the township right-of-way as well as the Township’s facilities.

Road repairs and maintenance are contracted annually using a competitive bid process. Currently, the Butler County Engineer’s Office services the contract for road repairs and maintenance.

There are approximately 80 miles of Township Roads (centerline measurement).

A

ALANA CT, ALEXIS DR, ALLISON AVE, ALSACE LN, ALSTATTER AVE, ALSTON AVE, ANN ELISE DR, APEX CT, ARCHERY LN, ARROYO RIDGE CT, ASH WAY, ASHBY CT, ASHVIEW PL, ASHWOOD KNOLLS DR, AUDUBON DR, AUTUMN HILL LN

B

BAFFIN DR, BAYBERRY CT, BAYBERRY DR, BEAGLE CT, BEAGLE DR, BEATY LN, BELMONT AVE, BERRYWOOD CT, BENNETT DR, BETSY ROSS CT, BETSY ROSS DR, BLACKFOOT CT, BLUE GRASS CT, BLUE HERON DR, BLUE RIDGE DR, BRAMBLE CT, BRIDGEWATER LN, BROFIELD DR, BROOK MEADOWS CT, BUTTONWOODCT

C

CALUSA DR, CANAL RD, CALUSA DR, CANASTOTA DR, CAROLINE FAYE CT, CARRINGTON WAY, CASANDRA DR, CASEY LN, CATHLEEN CT, CAVALCADE DR, CEDAR LAKE CT, CHANDLER WAY, CHARFIELD LN, CHATEAUGUAY DR, CHELSEA CT, CHESTNUT OAK CT, CHEYENNE CT, CHOCTAW LN, CITATION DR, CLARION CT, CLEARVIEW LAKE DR, CLEARVIEW LAKE LN, CLEARVIEW LAKE CT, CLOVIS DR, COBBLESTONE WAY, CONCORD AVE, CONLEY BOTTOM DR, CONNER CT, CONOVER ST, CRANBERRY CT, CREEK LAKE CT, CREEKSIDE DR, CREEKSIDE WAY, CREST MANOR DR, CROSS CREEK DR, CROWFOOT DR, CUMBERLAND DR, CUMBERLAND LAKE CT, CUNNINGHAM WAY, CYPRESS HILL DR

D

DAKOTA CT, DAN PATCH CT, DAWN DR, DELPHIA DR, DERBY DR, DIXON DR, DREW DR, DUFFY CT, DUST COMMANDER DR, DUST COMMANDER CT

E

EASTFIELD CT, EASTRIDGE DR, ECHO SPRINGS DR, EDISTO DR, EDWOOD DR, ELBERT DR, ELENOR DR, ELISSA DR, ELORA LN, ERDING CT, ERWIN MARIE LN, ESTILL AVE, EUREKA CT, EVANS CT, EXETER AVE

F

FAIR RIDGE LN, FAIRCREST DR, FAIRFAX AVE, FAIRFIELD FALLS CT, FAIRFIELD RIDGE DR, FAIRHAM RD, FAIRWAYS DR, FAYETTA DR, FERNWAY DR, FLETCHING CIR, FOREST HILL LN, FOX HOUND DR, FOX LAKE CT

G

GATEWAY AVE, GATEWAY DR, GEORGETOWN RD, GILMORE RD, GLENMONT DR, GOLF CLUB LN, GREATUS DR, GREEN CREST DR, GREEN KNOLL CIR, GREENLAWN RD, GREENS  WAY

H

HAGENCT, HARVARD ST, HASKINS CT, HASSFURT DR, HASTINGS AVE, HAVENWOOD CT, HAVERFORD DR, HEARTHWOOD CT, HEDGE LN, HICKORY GLEN DR, HICKORYVIEW DR, HILLGALE LN, HOLLYBERRY LN, HOLLY LN, HOLLYTREE CT, HUNTERS MOON CT, HUNTING HORN CT, HUNTSMAN WAY, HURON CT

I

IMLAY AVE, INDIAN CT, INDIAN HILL CT, INDIAN MEADOWS DR, INDIAN TRACE DR, IRON KETTLE CT, IRON KETTLE DR, IVYWOOD CT, IVYWOOD DR

J

JAMES PL, JAMIE DR, JAMIL CT, JAYFIELD CT, JAYFIELD DR, JENNY MARIE CT, JERRI TERRACE, JESSIE'S WAY, JOCELYN DR, JODPHUR CT, JOHN JACOB CT, JUDITH CT

K

KEENLAND DR, KELSO CT, KENDRICK CT, KIMBERLY DR, KING AVE, KIOWA CT, KRISTINE DR

L

LAKE CREST CT, LAKE POINT CT, LAKE RUN CT, LAKE VISTA CT, LAKEBROOK CT, LAKEVIEW CT, LAKEWOOD CT, LAKEWOOD DR, LEEWARD CT, LENOX AVE, LESLIE LEE CT, LESTER AVE, LIBERTY BELL DR, LILAC CT, LOGSDON RD, LONGBOW DR, LORAINE CT, LORINDA DR, LOVELACE DR, LUCIE MAY WAY

M

MAIDSTONE CT, MAPLE CREST CT, MAPLE CREST DR, MEDFORD CT, MELBORNE DR, MERLIN WAY, MILL CREEK CT, MILL POND CT, MILL POND  DR, MILL VIEW CT, MILLCREST DR, MILTON ST, MINDY DR, MORRIS RD

N

NADIR CT, NEWKIRK DR, NICKEY CT, NIEMOLLER DR

O

OAK RIDGE RD, OAK SPRING DR, OLD HICKORY DR, OLD LINE LN, OLD MILL CT, OLD STONE CT, ONIEDA CT, OSAGE DR

P

PADUCAH AVE, PALATINE AVE, PARKAMO AVE, PARKSIDE CT, PARRISH AVE, PATER AVE, PAWNEE CT, PEARL CREST DR, PEBBLERIDGE CT, PENELOPE DR, PIMLICO CT, PLEASANT RIDGE DR, PREAKNESS DR, PRESCOT CT, PRINCETON RD (FROM THE BY-PASS WEST BOUND), PRIVET CT

Q

QUIVERCT

R

RACHAEL'S RUN, RAVENA DR, RED ASH CT, RED BIRD LN, RED COAT DR, REDEEMER WAY, REIGART RD, RENTSCHLER ESTATES, RIDGEVIEW DR, RIPPLING LAKE CT, RIVA RIDGE DR, RIVER DOWNS DR, RIVER RIDGE DR, RIVER RIDGE LN, ROCHESTER AVE

S

SANDHILL CT, SAND RIDGE CT, SARA CT, SARATOGA CT, SARATOGA DR, SCHAFER KNOLL CT, SCHAFER RUN CT, SCHAFER RUN DR, SCHROEDER CT, SCHROEDER DR, SERVICE LN, SHADY CREEK WAY, SHADY MEADOWS DR, SHANNON DR, SHORE ACRES CT, SHOSHONI CT, SILVER FOX RUN, SPARKS LN, SPRING LAKE DR, SPRINGBROOK DR, SPRINGCREST DR, SPRINGMEADOW DR, SPRINGVIEW DR, STALLINGS DR, STAPLETON CT, STOCKBRIDGE LN, STONE LAKE WAY, STONE MILL CT, STONE MILL WAY, STONYBROOK DR, SUMMERDALE LN, SYLVIA DR

T

TALLY HO TRAIL, TAMMY RAE CT, TANTIVY TERRACE, TARA BROOKE CT, TARA BROOKE WAY, TAYLOR TRACE LN, THEODORE AVE, THERESA ANN DR, TONYA TRAIL, TREADWAY TRAIL, TULEY RD, TUSCARORA CT, TYLER POINT DR, TYLERSVILLE RD

U

URMSTON AVE, UTICAAVE

V

VINNEDGE RD, VONNIE VAIL CT

W

WALDEN CREEK CT, WALDEN PONDS CIR, WANDA WAY, WEATHERED OAKS CT, WEATHERED OAKS LN, WEISER CT, WEMBLEY CT, WESLEY WAY, WESTON CT, WHIRLAWAY CT, WILL'S WAY, WINDLAKE CT, WINFORD AVE, WINKLER DR, WINTER HILL CT, WOOD CT, WOODBERRY DR, WOODFIELD CT

X-Z

ZILPHA CT, ZOELLNER PL, ZOELLNER RIDGE, ZOELLNER WAY

Fairfield Township Board of Zoning Appeals 

The Fairfield Township Board of Zoning Appeals is comprised of five regular members and one alternate. Each member is appointed by the Township trustees. The Zoning Appeals Board is an administrative/judicial body and is responsible for hearing and deciding zoning appeals, authorizing variances, conditional uses. The Board is also responsible for interpreting the Fairfield Township Zoning Map and determining district boundaries.

The regular scheduled Fairfield Township Board of Zoning Appeals meetings will be held on the 4th Thursday of each month, as needed, except for the month of May and December due to Holidays. The meetings will be held at at 7:00 P.M., in the Fairfield Township Administration Building,6032 Morris Road, Hamilton, OH, 45011.

 

Current Members

 

Name: Jim Lupidi

Title: Chair

Date Appointed: 01/20/2016

Term Expires: 01/31/2025

 

Name: Karla Chaney

Title: Vice Chair

Date Appointed: 06/13/2018

Term Expires: 01/31/2024

 

Name: Michael Oler

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 10/25/2017

Term Expires: 01/31/2026

 

Name: Joseph Statzer

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 01/13/2021

Term Expires: 01/31/2023

 

Name: Denise McCoy

Title: Member

Date Appointed: 01/08/2020

Term Expires: 01/31/2027

 

Name: Vacancy

Title: Alternate

Date Appointed: 06/23/2021

Term Expires: 01/31/2023

Fire Department

Address:

6048 Morris Road
Hamilton, OH 45011

Non-emergency: 513-887-4402

Fax: 513-887-2705

Tim Thomas, Fire Chief Email

Matt Schumann, Asst. Fire Chief Email

American Flag

Station 211

Command Vehicles
Chief 210 - 2016 Chevy Tahoe - Command Vehicle
Chief 211 – 2020 Ford F150 - Command Vehicle
Captain 210 – 2020 Ford F150 - Command Vehicle

Inspector 210 - 2020 Ford F150 – Inspection Unit

 

Quint 211 - 2002 Sutphen
Quint 211 is a 1500 GPM pumper, 70+ft. ladder with a bucket, 400 gallons of Water and a variety of ladders and rescue equipment.

Quint means “five” – this truck has a pump, water tank, hose, ground ladders, and an aerial ladder

Engine 211 – 2021 E-One Typhoon
Engine 211 is a E-One Custom Rescue Pumper

Pumps 1500 gallons per minute and carries 780 Gallons of water. 1000 Foot of 5 inch supply line

Medic 211 -- 2017 Horton F550
This unit is the primary EMS response unit at Station 211.

It is equipped with advanced life support supplies.

Utility Vehicle U-211 - Ford F250

Service body unit with a tow package as well as a snow plow package.

Utility Vehicle U-213 – 2012 GMC Suburban

Service unit with a tow package

Boat 211 - Tracker Grizzly

This 22 foot tracker boat has a 50hp motor and can be deployed for water rescue situations.

Task 219 - 2009 International

This unit serves as the Butler County Bariatric Response Unit.

Task 2 - Ford 700 Rollup Body Semi

Part of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit and serves as a Mobile Warehouse for supplies.

Fire Safety Trailer - 2005 Surrey

Dedicated in 2005, this is a state-of-the-art Fire Safety Education trailer that will be used to enhance Community Safety Education.In addition to the standard fire safety education, both children and adults can learn to recognize severe weather warnings, and what steps should be taken to stay safe when severe weather threatens.

Fire Corps Fact Sheet 

Fire Corps is a locally-driven program under Citizen Corps that enables community members to offer their time and talents to their local fire/EMS department in a non-emergency role. 

Citizen Corps is an initiative under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to help coordinate volunteer activities that will make our communities safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to any emergency situation. 

Registered Fire Corps programs and their departments may be eligible for increased grant opportunities through your local Citizen Corps Council and through the DHS Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. 

Fire Corps was launched in December 2004 and is administered on a national level by the National Volunteer Fire Council in partnership with other fire service organizations. Both volunteer and career departments have Fire Corps programs. 

Fire Corps members support fire and EMS departments by performing non-emergency tasks, enabling department members to focus on emergency response and training. There are many ways community members can contribute to their local department, including, but not limited to:

  • Fire Prevention and Safety Education Rehab or Canteen Services
  • Fundraising Data Entry
  • Bookkeeping Administrative Functions
  • Public Relations Preplanning and Research
  • Apparatus and Facility Maintenance Bilingual Assistance

Engaging community members allows departments to increase the services they offer, such as enhanced fire safety education programs. In return, participants gain a greater understanding of the emergency services and become better prepared to handle their own emergency situations. 

Fire Corps aids in retention and recruitment efforts of first responders. Firefighters are able to focus on the emergency functions they signed up for while Fire Corps members tackle the nonemergency tasks. Also, Fire Corps members may ultimately decide to become first responders. 

The Fire Corps national office offers assistance and resources to citizens and departments to start, market, maintain, and expand local programs. Learn more at www.firecorps.org

If citizens offer their time to support a department in a non-emergency capacity, it qualifies as a Fire Corps program and can be registered with the national Fire Corps program. Registration is free at www.firecorps.org

Community members can call 1-800-FIRE-LINE to find out about local Fire Corps or first responder opportunities in their area. FIRE-LINE is a national recruitment campaign administered by the National Volunteer Fire Council through Fire Corps. 

Learn more about Fire Corps at www.firecorps.org or call 1-888-FC-INFO1 (324-6361).

Dangers and Challenges of Fire Fighting

Firefighting Video

This is a short film that visually demonstrates the dangers and challenges faced by firefighters during a structure fire.

This film serves to educate recruit firefighters, elected officials, and the public in fire department operations.

It demonstrates the need for a safe aggressive interior attack coupled with adequate resources in order to save lives and reduce property loss. 

2019 Annual Report

To receive a copy of the 2019 report please email us at either tthomas@fairfieldtwp.org or jvonderhaar@fairfieldtwp.org.  The file was too large to be downloaded to the website.

Working in Partnership with the Community

The Fairfield Township Police Department takes great pride in the relationship it shares with the community. Additionally, it has implemented effective community outreach programs in furtherance of educating the community in areas involving crime prevention and community relations. There has been overwhelming success with the various programs, and the department shall continue to maintain community partnerships to keep Fairfield Township a safe place to live.

Filing a Complaint

  • Personnel complaint forms are maintained in a clearly visible location in the police department lobby and is accessible on the department website. (Download the complaint form)
  • You may file a complaint in-person at the police department during business hours (Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 4: 30 p.m.). The police department address is 6485 Vonnie Vale Court, Fairfield Township, Ohio 45011
  • You can call the police department during business hours at 513-785-4174.
  • You can call after business hours by calling dispatch at 513-785-1300.

Private Roadways in Fairfield Township

  • LEEDS LN
  • WILDBRANCH DR
  • WEXFORD WAY
  • WATER FOWL LN
  • LEES FORD LN
  • HIEB LN
  • HICKORY TRAIL PLACE
  • GRISTMILL DR
  • GRADOLPH ST (AKA Ferndale-Off RT4)
  • EXCALIBUR LN
  • EDITH AVE
  • CROOKED TREE CIRCLE
  • COOKIE LN
  • ASHTON CIRCLE
  • BENTBRANCH DR
  • CAMARGO MOBILE HOME PARK
  • DEERFIELD MOBILE HOME PARK
  • CARDIFF CT
Household Hazardous waste drop-off flyer

Sponsored by Butler County Waste and Recycle 

Available for Butler County residents, the attached flyers explain both programs in detail.

Fairfield Township offers one recycle location at the Fire Department Head Quarters on Morris Road

For additional information on waste removal and recycling please visit http://www.butlercountyrecycles.org/

children's playground

Park Information

The Service Department maintains two parks, approximately 47 acres, in the Township - the Millikin/Morris Road Heroes Park and the Vonnie Vale Drive Shaffer's Run Park.  Both are home to playgrounds, tennis and pickle ball courts, basketball hoops, walking paths, shelters, and restrooms. 

The Shaffer's Run Park has a newly renovated dog park, called Holly's Dog Park, which is separated by large and small dogs.  The Millikin/Morris Road Heroes Park has three baseball fields.

Rentschler Park, 443 acres and the largest Metro park in Butler County, is also located in Fairfield Township, but is owned and maintained by Metroparks.

All shelters are available for use on a first come first serve basis.  Most are equipped with a grill.  If there are any questions or issues please contact Dianne French at 513-785-2247 or dfrench@fairfieldtwp.org.

Old Fire House with firefighters in front
Figure 2 – Company #1 (1950’s)

Life Squads were far and few in between. For the most part only cities in Butler County had any form of Life Squad Service. In 1953, Fairfield Township purchased a Ford Ambulance. Fairfield Township was the first volunteer fire department in Butler County to provide Life Squad Service for the community. Life Squad Service, in the beginning was manned by fire department personnel who had completed an American Red Cross First Aid Course.

Over the course of time requirements by the State of Ohio made additional training necessary. In the 1970’s a state Emergency Medical Technician class was required. Later different levels of training were developed to take care of the ever growing need for Emergency Medical needs in the field.

In August 2000 Paramedic Service became a reality in the township. Today the fire department runs two equipped Medic Squads. Both of the departments front line engines are equipped with paramedic equipment , allowing them to respond and provide the highest level of medical care without having to wait for an ambulance to arrive on scene.

Also in 1953, the township purchased a 1000 gallon tanker which was housed at Symmes Corner. A 900 gallon International tanker was donated to the township, which they housed at the Tylersville Road Fire House.

In 1954 Fairfield City broke off from the township and incorporated. With the township losing a fire house to the newly incorporated Fairfield City the need for another fire house was apparent.

Core Values

Professionalism

Fairness

Respect

Integrity

Dispositions

Each personnel complaint shall be classified with one of the following dispositions:

Unfounded – When the investigation discloses that the alleged acts did not occur or did not involve department members. Complaints that are determined to be frivolous will fall within the classification of unfounded.

Exonerated – When the investigation discloses that the alleged act occurred but that the act was justified, lawful and/or proper.

Not sustained – When the investigation discloses that there is insufficient evidence to sustain the complaint or fully exonerate the member.

Sustained – When the investigation discloses sufficient evidence to establish that the act occurred and that it constituted misconduct.

Mission Statement

Treat everyone like family while providing an unmatched level of concern for life and property.

fire truck

Station 212

Engine 212 - 2013 Sutphen Pumper

This front line vehicle has a 1000 GPM single stage centrifugal pump.

Medic 212 – 2021 Ford F550 Braun

Primary life squad for station 212. Equipped with ALS supplies.

Reserve Engine 213 - 2008 Sutphen
Engine 213 is a 2008 Sutphen Custom Rescue Pumper

Pumps 1500 gallons per minute and carries 500 Gallons of water. This engine also has a 10kw hydraulic generator, carries 1000 feet of five inch hose and uses Elkhart Brass low pressure, high flow nozzles.

Engine 213 Compartment Doors
Fairfield Township Firefighters also suggested this engine have a memorial on the rear compartment doors as a reminder to “Never Forget.”

 

Reserve Squad/Medic 213 - 2013 Chevy 4500 Horton

Reserve life squad for station 212. Equipped with ALS supplies.

Utility Vehicle U-212 – 2016 GMC 3500 Pick Up

Used as a service vehicle and reserve staff vehicle as needed.

Home Fire Sprinklers

Fire Sprinklers are economical, reliable and proven to be the best way to protect your family and home from the dangers of fire. Click the following link to watch a timeline video of a home fire:

Home Fire Timeline Video

For more information on home fire sprinklers, please visit: http://www.homefiresprinkler.org/

Types of Disciplinary Action

  • Employee Counseling
  • Verbal Reprimand (reduced to writing)
  • Written Reprimand
  • Suspension
  • Demotion
  • Termination
Fire Department Volunteers
Figure 3 – Company #1 (1955)

Thus, in 1954 fire house #3 was built on Reigart Road, exactly five miles from the station on Tylersville Road. It was equipped with the 900 gallon International tanker.

Fire fighters standing in front of a truck

Vision Statement

Build a premier fire department through exceptional training, inspiring our members to exceed their goals, leading ourselves and our department, being fiscally responsible, and dedicating ourselves as stewards of our community.

Driver Safety Tips

The National Safety Council recommends the following:

DRIVING AT NIGHT: Traffic death rates are three times greater at night than during the day, according to the National Safety Council. Prepare your car for night driving:

  1. Clean headlights, taillights, signal lights and windows (inside and out) once per week, or more often as necessary.
  2. Have your headlights properly aimed.
  3. Have your headlights properly aimed. Misaimed headlights blind other drivers and reduce your ability to see the road.
  4. Do not drink and drive. Not only does alcohol severely impair your driving ability, it also acts as a depressant. Just one drink can induce fatigue.
  5. Avoid smoking when you drive. The nicotine and carbon monoxide in smoke hampers night vision
  6. Reduce your speed and increase your following distance. it is more difficult to judge the speed and distance of another vehicle at night
  7. If there is any doubt, turn on your headlights. Lights will not help you see better in early twilight, but they will make it easier for other drivers to see you. Being seen is as important as seeing.
  8. Do not overdrive your headlights. You should be able to stop inside the illuminated area. If you are not, then you are creating a blind crash area in front of your vehicle
  9. When following another vehicle, keep your headlights on low beams so you do not blind the driver ahead of you.
  10. If an oncoming vehicle does not lower beams from high to low, avoid glare by watching the right edge of the road and using it as a steering guide.
  11. Make frequent stops for light snacks and exercise. If you are too tired to drive, stop and get some rest.
  12. If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible. Warn approaching traffic at once by setting up reflecting triangles near your vehicle and 300 feet behind it. Turn on flashers and the dome light. Stay off the roadway and get passengers away from the area.

FOG: It is best not to drive in foggy conditions. However, if you must drive in the fog, take the following precautions:

  1. Slow down and watch your speedometer. Fog creates a visual illusion of slow motion when you may actually be speeding.
  2. Remember, going too slow can be hazardous. If you see approaching headlights or taillights, slow down even more. A driver may be driving in the center of the roadway or may be stopped or barely moving.
  3. Drive with your headlights set on dim, or use fog lights if available. High beams will reflect back off the fog and actually impair visibility even more.
  4. Do not overdrive your headlights. Stay within the limits of your vision. You may have to stop suddenly. If the fog is too dense, pull off the roadway and stop.
  5. Use your turn signals long before you turn and brake early when you approach a stop to warn other drivers.
  6. Use the right edge of the road or painted road markings as a guide.
  7. Be patient. Do not pass lines of traffic.

RAIN: When rain begins to fall lightly, water, dust, oil and leaves cause the roadway to become slippery.

  1. Increase your following distance. Take special care on curves and turns and while braking.
  2. Your headlights must be on when operating your wipers. Parking lights alone are not acceptable.
  3. When rain begins to fall heavily, your tires may hydroplane. This means the tires are riding on a layer of water and not on the roadway. Avoid hydroplaning by slowing down and keeping your tires properly maintained.

HIGH WINDS: Wind can be a difficult problem for all drivers. In high winds, you should reduce your speed and make steering corrections when you go from a protected area to an open area and when meeting large vehicles such as trucks and buses. Heavy rain or sleet often accompanies high winds. You should be alert to wet or slippery areas and plan for those conditions.

Fire Department Volunteers
Figure 4 – Company #3 (1950’s)

From the start of the township fire department, firemen were notified of fires by a roof siren being set off at each fire house.

The township contracted a telephone system from Cincinnati Bell Telephone. Fire phones, as they began to be referred as, were placed in a member’s home. Usually it was required that the house could be counted on to answer the phone most of the time. That is why several phones were placed. In addition each fire house had a fire phone.

The houses with phones had a door bell type button installed next to the phone. This button activated the roof sirens at the fire houses. The sirens were old World War Two Air Raid Sirens donated through Civil Defense. 

When the first fireman arrived at the fire house he would call the fire phone and he would be supplied with the address and nature of the call. In turn he would then write the address on a chalk board in the fire house for all other arriving members to see the location of the call. The chalk board was needed because in the early days of volunteer firefighting only a couple firemen could ride on the truck. Most of the firemen drove their personal car to the fires.

In the event the alarm was for a Life Squad the person answering the call would call members of the department that were Life Squad qualified to fill the call. At the very least two members had to make the call. In the event no one was around to take the call, the Butler County Sheriff’s Deputies drove station wagons with ambulance cots in the rear.

The only service they could provide was what we call load and go. No emergency medical attention was applied to the patient.

In 1959 a fire levy was passed and the township purchased a new Cadillac Ambulance equipped with all the modern first aid gear to date. As times changed so did the need for a better method of notifying members of fires and life squad calls.

In the mid 1970’s the township purchased a radio system which replaced the need for roof sirens. Radio desk base stations were installed in the homes that had the fire phones. Each fireman was given a radio receiver (Plectron) that they kept at home. When a call was received tones were sent out over the radio and voice notification was given whether the call was a fire or a call for the life squad.

In the first few months of operation the roof siren still sounded when a fire call was sent out. The chalk board continued use for a short time until all members became familiar with the new system.

In the mid to late 1980’s the plectrons were phased out and replaced with personal pagers that each member carried. The fire phone system eventually became obsolete and the Butler County Sheriff took over the responsibility of dispatching the fire department.

Today the members are required to take shifts manning the fire station so response time is held to a minimum. At night, on large fires, some volunteers still respond from their homes to get back up engines or squads for the runs as needed.

In 1956 a new GMC front mount pumper was purchased by the township for use at fire house #3 on Reigart Road. The need for additional fire equipment was deemed necessary as more houses were built in this area of the township.

In 1964 the membership decided it was time to bring the fire department more up to date. The members approached the township trustees with the idea of purchasing a new modern pumper to meet the needs of a growing community.

However, the township was not in a financial position to purchase such a truck. The members were determined to get a new truck, so the membership got together and decided to give up their run pay to purchase the new pumper. The trustees agreed and a 1964 F.W.D. Pumper was purchased. The truck was a demonstrator that had become available at a good price. This was a huge step forward for firefighting in the township.

Fire Station

Core Values

  • Courage: to act when action poses danger with appreciation for the risks knowing the benefits are greater.
  • Honor: protection our brothers and sisters and the fire service family.
  • Pride: proud of the department we work for, our heritage, and our traditions.
  • Dedication: placing the needs of the public and those we work with above our own.
  • Trust: we will trust one another in such a way that puts the safety, effectiveness, and reputation of the team and the Department first.

What to do if your Car Catches Fire

A fire in one’s car or other motor vehicle is a frightening situation which can quickly involve great personal danger to vehicle occupants and bystanders. Although every vehicle fire incident will have certain unique factors present at the time, the National Safety Council offers the following step-by-step general suggestions on what to do if your car (or other motor vehicle) catches on fire.

While you are moving on a roadway:

  1. Signal your intentions and move to the right lane.
  2. Get onto the shoulder or breakdown lane.
  3. Stop immediately.
  4. Shut off the engine.
  5. Get yourself and all other persons out of the vehicle.
  6. Get far away from the vehicle and stay away from it. Keep onlookers and others away.
  7. Warn oncoming traffic.
  8. Notify the fire department.
  9. Don’t attempt to try to put out the fire yourself. (The unseen danger is the possible ignition of fuel in the
  10. vehicle’s tank.)

While the vehicle is stopped in traffic or parked:

  1. Shut off the engine.
  2. Get far away from the vehicle.
  3. Warn pedestrians and other vehicles to stay away.
  4. Notify the fire department.
  5. Don’t attempt to try to put out the fire yourself. (The unseen danger is the possible ignition of fuel in the vehicle’s tank.)

In all vehicle fire situations, the first thing to think about is personal safety; Any vehicle can be replaced, humans cannot. Think and act quickly, in the safest way possible.

Thank you to the National Safety Council
www.nsc.org/library/facts/carfire.htm

Firefighters of the past
Figure 5 – Company #3 (1960’s)

With nowhere to house the new truck an additional truck bay was added to the Tylersville Road Fire House. The addition was built by members of the department. In the early days of the department, if not for the members doing the work, a lot of what you see today would not exist.

Over the years members of the department donated goods and services to the betterment of the department. Most of the mechanical work done on the trucks and squad was performed by members of the department. They changed the oil as needed and many times paid for the repairs out of their own pocket. Back then all the members had a stake in the township and the need to bond together to provide the best possible service for all the citizens.

The members’ wives were also involved with the operation of the department. They had formed the ladies auxiliary which held fund raisers for the fire department and a lot of time provided much needed food and refreshment to the firemen on large fires. Without the support of the wives a lot of the social and community functions carried out the fire department, would not have ever happened.

As you can see early volunteer fire departments were in essence a family function. As a volunteer, many nights firemen were out all night helping people with flooded basements, downed trees, or any number of other community needs. Not to mention the nights you would be at a fire all night. Many employers back then understood the need for volunteer departments and would excuse employees from work for the day if they had been out all night. Not many employers if any today would be supportive to employees that were also volunteer firefighters.

Even the public view has changed. There used to be a waiting list to get on the department and then even a long wait once you were on to get on the life squad schedule. Volunteer firefighters in this area of the country are becoming far and few in between. It will be a sad state when no one will volunteer to help their neighbor or community without being paid for their services.

Thus I take my hat off to the members of the department in 1964 who gave up their pay so the township could purchase a much needed, new pumper for the community.

In 2005 the County and Township worked together to create several Residential Improvement Districts (RIDS). The RIDS serve as a vehicle to divert Real Property Tax into a separate fund.  The fund is then used for infrastructure improvements within the RID areas.

The links above include maps of each area placed in a RID.

Fire house #2
Figure 6 – Fire House #2 (1960’s)

The fire Department did not have any major changes after purchasing the 1964 FWD Pumper for several years to come. In the mid 1970’s the fire department purchased a new style of life squad. The department started running out of a van style ambulance. Within a year or so, a second van squad was purchased and for the first time the township now had a life squad at each of its stations.

Van style ambulance
Figure 7 – Van Style Ambulance

Department members now had to take state mandated Emergency Medical Technician Training. This required classroom and practical training at a local hospital. With this training the fire department was better prepared to serve the community’s medical emergencies. In 1978 several members of the department attended paramedic training in Dayton, Ohio. This was done with hopes the township would make the switch to a paramedic unit, but this was not to be realized for at least 20 more years.

This is an example of the hope that members of the department had. They were always looking to improve the service the department could provide and in doing so has kept this fire department on the leading edge of the fire service.

There were many members, with various skills brought to the department. Many times when there was no way to purchase needed materials, these members would make the needed item. For example, in those days farms were still plentiful in the township and surrounding area. One of the members made a nozzle out of a 2 ½ inch coupling and a three foot piece of cast iron pipe. This was used to put out bales of hay on fire. It was not the easiest nozzle to handle but it sure did the job. This is another example of how the members came together to make this a better fire department. This was the volunteer spirit which had always been strong in Fairfield Township.

In early 70’s the fire department held raffles and raised funds to build an addition to the fire house on Tylersville Road. The new addition included a large day room or common area, equipped kitchen, a second restroom, and three offices for fire department use. One of the offices was eventually given to the township police department for use by their officers. This area became a spot for members to gather and socialize. Christmas parties, association meetings, meals, and many other functions took place in the new day room of fire house #1.

In 1977, while hosting part of the Butler County Fire School, the fire department had the unthinkable happen. The fire departments’ best front line pumper (1964 FWD) was parked on Milton Street pumping water for a structure fire class.

The driver did everything right and no one ever suspected this could happen. The truck was parked on a steep grade, the brake was set, and the wheels were chocked. During the exercise the chock broke and the parking brake could not hold the weight of the truck. Before anyone could react the truck rolled down Milton Street striking a house at the corner of Milton and Lester. The truck sustained considerable damage. The house was actually knocked off the foundation.

The only saving grace was the truck drove over a cistern and the lid collapsed stopping the truck from going through the house. Even though badly damaged the truck started and pulled away from the house under its own power. The truck was driven back to fire house #1 and taken out of service. It was a frightening moment for the firemen. The township was now protected by two old obsolete trucks.

The FWD was going to need major overhauling to get back in service. The truck was sent to the Seagrave Fire Company in Wisconsin for refitting. The truck came back with a new look. Members rewired the emergency lights, installed a new electronic siren, split the 2½ inch hose bed so dual supply lines could be laid at a fire scene. (This was before 5’ hose became widely used) This truck or engine as we now call them was back in service and was the front line pumper at fire house #1.

FWD pumper Fire Truck in color
Figure 8 – FWD Pumper (Photo 1980)

In that same year the fire department saw the need for a new pumper. The township trustee were approached and presented with the facts and figures of purchasing a new truck. Remember the last truck was purchased in 1964; prices had gone up quite a bit.

Specifications for the new truck were drawn up and the township trustees agreed to accept bids for the purchase of a new fire engine. The bids were reviewed and a bid from the Emergency One Fire Engine Company was accepted. The new truck was delivered in 1978 and housed at the fire house on Reigart Road. The biggest difference in the truck was the color. The truck was painted a bright green. A study had shown that this green color was easier to see.

Many fire departments in the country changed the color of their trucks from the traditional fire red to this new bright green color. Here in Butler County the City of Hamilton and Liberty Township purchased all green trucks. Recently Hamilton changed back to the fire red.

The new truck was of a new design. Most of the body of the truck was made from aluminum. This was not used widely at this time in vehicle construction. The truck made its first response to an explosion at the Egner Trucking Company on Hamilton Middletown Road.

1977 was indeed a busy year for the fire department. The trustees had been meeting in an old school house on Tylersville Road next to fire house #1. The trustees decided that a new administration building was necessary for a growing community. Plans for the building were presented to the board of trustees. The plans included a new police station, township offices, meeting hall, and a new fire station.

The new station would have drive through bays, a kitchen, and a day room. When the new administration/fire house was completed, the old fire house on Reigart Road was closed.

The new fire house at 6032 Morris Road housed the new Emergency One Pumper, the Grass Fire Truck, the 1956 GMC Pumper, and a Life Squad. This move brought more changes to the fire department.

FWD Pumper Fire Truck in black and white
Figure 8 – FWD Pumper 1977

In that same year the fire department saw the need for a new pumper. The township trustee were approached and presented with the facts and figures of purchasing a new truck. Remember the last truck was purchased in 1964; prices had gone up quite a bit.

Specifications for the new truck were drawn up and the township trustees agreed to accept bids for the purchase of a new fire engine. The bids were reviewed and a bid from the Emergency One Fire Engine Company was accepted. The new truck was delivered in 1978 and housed at the fire house on Reigart Road. The biggest difference in the truck was the color. The truck was painted a bright green. A study had shown that this green color was easier to see.

Many fire departments in the country changed the color of their trucks from the traditional fire red to this new bright green color. Here in Butler County the City of Hamilton and Liberty Township purchased all green trucks. Recently Hamilton changed back to the fire red.

The new truck was of a new design. Most of the body of the truck was made from aluminium. This was not used widely at this time in vehicle construction. The truck made its first response to an explosion at the Egner Trucking Company on Hamilton Middletown Road.

1977 was indeed a busy year for the fire department. The trustees had been meeting in an old school house on Tylersville Road next to fire house #1. The trustees decided that a new administration building was necessary for a growing community. Plans for the building were presented to the board of trustees. The plans included a new police station, township offices, meeting hall, and a new fire station.

The new station would have drive through bays, a kitchen, and a day room. When the new administration/fire house was completed, the old fire house on Reigart Road was closed.

The new fire house at 6032 Morris Road housed the new Emergency One Pumper, the Grass Fire Truck, the 1956 GMC Pumper, and a Life Squad. This move brought more changes to the fire department.

International Grass Truck
Figure 10 – International Grass Truck

Fire headquarters was established at the Tylersville Road station, and the fire houses were renumbered for the first time since the department started. The new fire house on Morris Road would be called Station One and the fire house on Tylersville Road would be called Station Two.

From this point forward you hardly ever heard anyone refer them as fire houses, in the new generation they became known as stations. With a headquarters established for the first time, better record keeping became available. With the police out of the Tylersville station it gave the department much needed space. The large office was turned into storage/supply room; the other offices were for the Chief’s and officer’s use.

The 70’s brought about much change in the turnout gear that firefighters were wearing. The first major change was in helmet construction. Most departments were using aluminum helmets and had been for years. Many firemen were hurt because the helmet conducted electricity. The heavy rubber coats only gave minimal protection against fire and/or chemical exposure. Through the advances of science plastic was being used in a larger market than ever before. It did not take long for fire equipment companies to realize the advantages of plastic.

Of course not everyone was convinced in the beginning. Like all new products the old timers were set in their ways and it would take a few years to win them over. In 1974 a new low profile helmet was produced, it was OSHA compliant and lightweight. This helmet was the 770 Philadelphian, produced for its name sake, The Philadelphia Fire Department. The Cairns Company produced this helmet. It is only fitting that the helmet was custom made for a department that the founding father of firefighting in America lived, Benjamin Franklin.

The other change in turnout gear was a new style coat. The first was a coat made of a cotton material, and referred as “duck coats”. In the mid 1970’s DuPont developed a new fire resistant material known as Nomex. This material became widely used in fire turnout gear. Most turnouts today have their roots to this discovery in the 70’s.

Another important item in the firefighters gear came into use by this department around 1976. This being the S.C.B.A., or self-contained breathing apparatus. Surprisingly enough the firefighters did not have anything to wear to protect their lungs except a couple old mine style gas masks. This did not give you clean air to breath, only filtered. The first two S.C.B.A. units were carried in a large suitcase type device. These were later mounted in the jump seats on the 1964 FWD.

Though commonly used today in the fire service, these breathing devices were not easily available to most departments. The early S.C.B.A. units were expensive and cost prohibitive to smaller departments.

In 1984 the department set bids for a new fire engine. Nothing like we had ever had before. This new truck would have all the best that fire engines were offering at the time. The members knew they wanted a Sutphen Pumper, just from everything we knew about them they were the best constructed fire engines around.

Plans were drawn up and the township trustees advertised for bids. Several bids were received, but everyone knew the only truck in consideration was the Sutphen. When this engine arrived it was almost a celebration of sorts.

1984 Sutphen Pumper Fire Truck
Figure 11 – 1984 Sutphen Pumper

To the members at fire station #2 this was a dream come true. The engine had diesel, automatic transmission, a deck gun, 5’ supply line, and so much more. A fire engine had not brought as much excitement since the firemen purchased the truck in 1964.

In 1986 the members at fire station #2 on Tylersville decided it was time for a change at their station. Ideas were kicked around and it was decided to do a major overhaul of the truck bays.

While the fire chief was at the trustees meeting approaching them with the idea, members at station #2 had already begun demolishing the interior of the bays. By the time the chief returned most of the interior wall separating the two bays laid in a pile of rubble on the station floor. The remodel kept evolving as construction continued. Eventually the ceiling was removed and the new ceiling was raised higher which allowed for better lighting in the truck bays. The floors were torn up and a new concrete floor was poured.

The station was repainted, rewired, new bay doors, and all the work was performed by the members of fire station #2. This station stands today showing what can happen when the traditional volunteer spirit is brought out. This rivaled the earlier members giving up pay so the township could have a new pumper.

In 1986 while returning from an auto accident William Gray was at the wheel and Darrell Murrell was riding in the officer’s seat. On Hamilton Mason Road just west of Morris Road Mr. Gray suffered a heart attack and lost control of the fire engine. The engine went off the south side of the road into a ravine. The force of the impact threw Darrell into the dash breaking one of his legs. Bill who was at the wheel was killed in the accident.

This became the darkest day in the history of the Fairfield Township Fire Department. Never before had a firefighter been killed in the line of duty. Mr. William Gray was buried with full honors. A memorial stands today in his honor at fire station #2. It contains his helmet, coat, boots, and pager. As well as the bell off the 1947 International pumper.

In 1997 the township trustees sent out for bids to purchase a new pumper. The fire department drew up specifications and bids were received on the new pumper. The township purchased a new Sutphen pumper. This truck like others in the past carried all the latest technology and best design of modern fire engines. This truck was placed in service at Station #2 on Tylersville Road. Today, this truck is the first out engine from Station #2.

1997 Sutphen Fire Truck
Figure 12 – 1997 Sutphen

Fairfield Township saw a large amount of residential building in the 90’s. The fire department saw a need for a new fire station and headquarters building. The township Trustees were approached and presented with the idea of a new fire station and headquarters building. The township set aside land beside the present township Administration building.

In 2000, a new fire station was built, which houses fire station #1 and the fire department headquarters. The building was like nothing the fire department had ever seen before. It contained offices for the fire department administration, training room, sleeping quarters, drive thru bays, and room for future expansion.

Today this station is home to the Fire Chief, Assistant Fire Chief, Station officers, and more. This building was a dream come true for the members of the department.

1994 brought about political events which forced the trustees to seek changing the status of the township into a new city. Recent changes in state law made it possible for a township to change from a township form of government into a city form of government. The board of trustees filed the necessary paperwork with Butler County thus forming the City of Indian Springs. The trustees sought this change in an attempt to protect our borders from annexation.

But the change was challenged in court and the township was forced to return to township status, but not before getting the approval from the cities surrounding us. In order to return to township status a portion of township land was incorporated into the City of Hamilton.

When the department started hiring part time firefighter/paramedics for daytime coverage it became apparent that the department needed to have leadership in place to provide firefighter assignments, supervise employees, and provide structure for the department. It was decided that the position of Assistant Fire Chief would become a full time position.

Assistant Chief Paul McKendry was the first full time employee of the Fire Department. He was hired on June 5, 2000, Paul was a volunteer Assistant Fire Chief for Fairfield Township before becoming full time. 

In 2002, the fire department sought to purchase a ladder or tower fire truck. This truck like all others was put out for bids by the board of trustees. The department purchased a 2002 Sutphen 75’ Tower. This truck was designated Quint 11 and housed at station #1 on Morris Road.

2002 Sutphen Quint Fire Truck
Figure 13 – 2002 Sutphen Quint

The Fairfield Township Fire Department has seen many changes from the first formation in 1947. This fire department has always been innovative and progressive.

On July 31, 2006 Fire Chief David Downie became Fairfield Townships first full time Fire Chief. Now with a full time fire chief at the helm the township can count on a professional and community oriented fire department for many years to come.

In 2007, the fire department celebrated 60 years of service to the citizens of Fairfield Township. This brings with it a sense of pride with it. This is one of the oldest volunteer fire departments in the county, if not the oldest.

Volunteer departments are very different from Career fire departments. Career department consist of full time paid employees. Volunteer departments consist of your neighbour’s, your friends; people all coming together to provide a necessary service to the community.

When the alarm sounds volunteers drop what they are doing and become fire fighters. Volunteers come from many different backgrounds. It can be a mix of white collar, blue collar, self-employed, or just about any type of job or employment. But when the alarm sounds they all come together for a common cause, as old as the United States.

Volunteer fire departments date back to Benjamin Franklin at the founding of our country. Helping their neighbour’s is the volunteer spirit.

It has been said, why do fire fighters run into a burning building when everyone else is running out, the reason is to help your fellow man. Volunteers have a connection to the community they serve and the residents who are their friends and neighbours. As the number of calls has increased so did the challenge to remain a volunteer department.

In order to provide the necessary services and response to our community the department has transitioned into a staffed department. As our ability to respond was impacted by the availability of volunteers the department moved to a part time staffing operation. This allowed the department to assure that we were able to respond to calls.

The Township realized that this change also created a need for some level of supervision and a full time Assistant Fire Chief position was created, and eventually a Full Time Fire Chief and a Training Captain were added to the full time staff.

The addition of part-time staffing and the addition of limited full time staffing have allowed the department to continue to provide the highest quality service to our community.

As both the type and number of calls continues to increase, we continue to prepare for the evolution of the department and changes to our staffing levels. We have worked hard to maintain our facilities and equipment. In 2013 the department will accepted delivery of both a new EMS unit as well as a new fire engine.

Chevy 4500 Horton Ambulance

2013 Chevy 4500 Horton Ambulance

The department has been working towards the replacement of the Tylersville Road station since 2009. In 2018 the Board of Trustees has taken steps to move this project forward.

Sutphen Pumper Fire Truck

2012 Sutphen Pumper

F550 Horton Ambulance

2017 F550 Horton Ambulance

Tracker Grizzly Boat

2012 Tracker Grizzly

Even as the fire department here in Fairfield Township continues to evolve based on meeting the ever-changing needs of the community, we are moving into addressing the staffing needs of the community.

The department has continued the replacement of our equipment helping to ensure we can provide the best possible response.

In 2016 we added a 2012 Tracker Boat to the fleet. Improving our water rescue capabilities.

GMC 3500 Fire Truck

In 2017 two utility vehicles were added to the fleet.

2016 GMC 3500

Ford 250 Fire Truck

2016 F250

Fire station on Tylersville Rd
In Service from 1948 - 2019

2019 will be remembered for the opening of the NEW Station 212. The Township built a replacement station for the Tylersville Road Building. The Tylersville Road facility had served the Township well for many years. The changes in the Department resulted in the need for an updated facility. The NEW Station 212 is located at 6911 Gilmore Road, between Hamilton Mason and Princeton Road. The new building has been designed to support future growth as well as house the new larger apparatus of today’s Fire Service.

The new building has expanded crew quarters designed to house up to 10 personnel with expanded kitchen and dayroom areas. The bays are able to house any of our current equipment and have been sized to support future equipment which seems to grow in size with each passing year.

We hope that this new building will serve the community as well as the old station has.

Fire Dept Sign on new building

Fire Department Sign on the New Building

New Station
Dedicated May 11, 2019

The current members and past members can take pride in the service this department has provided over the last 60 years. The hard work and dedication of all if the members both past and present have helped to make the Fire Department what it is today

This is dedicated to all the men and women who have served The Fairfield Township fire department