Departments

FD
Alarm

HISTORY OF THE

FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT

ANSWERING THE ALARM

 

SINCE 1947

 The first known action by anyone was taken in the year 1898, by a group of Township residents. They met at the home of Adam Braun and organized a volunteer fire department.

They built a two wheel cart and mounted a fifty gallon cylinder tank to the cart. The cart was equipped with a hand pump, buckets, and fifty foot of hose no bigger than a modern garden hose. The new fire cart was housed in the rear of Kreiling’s Saloon. This was the beginnings of the current Fairfield Township Fire Department.

The next recorded history is in 1922 when a group of residents known as the Rosedale Improvement Association procured ten fire extinguishers. They were installed in every third house in the subdivision. This system served until 1945 when the need for more adequate fire protection could no longer be ignored. This was due to a fire in October of 1944 on Pater Avenue where several members of a family were burned to death in a structure fire.

The Fairfield and Belmont Volunteer Firemen’s Association was formed. These men worked to gather donations to purchase a fire truck. Volunteers paid an initiation fee of $10 to the association and served without pay. With donated material and men from the association working together, the first fire station was built on the corner of Tuley Road and Belmont Avenue – (This is a vacant lot today).

In 1946 the volunteers had a fire house for their newly acquired truck. The truck was a 1930 Model A Ford, which was refurbished by Fred Mullins and Ralph Kearney. It carried 1500 gallons of water. Many times the volunteers themselves paid for the oil and gas for the truck.

Ralph Kearney was appointed Chief of the Department.

Fred Mullins and Garth Day were appointed Assistant Chief of the Department.

In June of 1947 it became apparent that this small organization could not provide adequate protection for the entire township. A meeting was called by Harold Linz to discuss the possibility of passing a bond issue to fund a township fire department. The trustees being John McGreevy, Carl Schiering, and A.B. McCormick agreed to place the issue on the ballot that November. The bond issued passed by an overwhelming majority.

In 1948 a 500 gallon International Fire Truck was purchased by the township and housed in a new fire house built on Tylersville Road on the corner of Exeter Street. This fire house is still in use today.

 

FD

 

Figure 1 – 1947 International Pumper

 The trustees appointed Fred Mullins as the first Fire Chief of the township.

 The township has only had eight fire chiefs since 1948.

Fred Mullins served for 8 years as Chief. He was followed in order by Robert Sroufe, David Downie, Harold Niemoller, William Hieb, James Wargo, David Downie , and Timothy Thomas hired in 2012..

In August of 2006, David Downie after serving as Volunteer Fire Chief for 20 years was hired as the first full time Fire Chief in Fairfield Township.

The firemen’s association survived the township taking over the operation of the fire department. It continued for many years as a sort of social organization within the fire department. The association hired new firemen, voted for their choice of fire chief as needed and raised money to purchase items for the department that the township did not have the money purchase. These were funded through dances, raffles, and other forms of fund raising.

Firemen applied for acceptance to the department to the association and the association voted to hire or refuse the application. Three no votes were needed to turn a candidate down for the department.

The association also held several social events throughout the year for the members. The Christmas party was a favorite among the member’s children, as Santa Claus arrived on the back of the fire truck with a present for all the children. Halloween was another fun time for the membership. The members dressed in costume and competed in games. A spring picnic was held at a near by park with all the usual food and games. With changes in society and the lack of interest by the membership, the association eventually became out dated and brought about its end.

The township took over the purchase of all equipment and the hiring of all personnel. Even though the association did not last, for many years it was the backbone of the fire department. This is true not only in Fairfield Township, but in most of the volunteer departments in Butler County. There are still some associations working today at some of the smaller departments who do not have the funds they need to run their departments.

 In 1951 the township trustees realized the need for additional equipment. A 500 gallon GMC pumper was purchased and housed at Symmes Corner in what now is Fairfield City. This became known as fire house #2, with fire house #1 being on Tylersville Road.

 

Old station

 

Figure 2 – Company #1 (1950’s)

 Life Squads were far and few in between. For the most part only cities in Butler County had any form of Life Squad Service. In 1953, Fairfield Township purchased a Ford Ambulance. Fairfield Township was the first volunteer fire department in Butler County to provide Life Squad Service for the community. Life Squad Service, in the beginning was manned by fire department personnel who had completed an American Red Cross First Aid Course.

Over the course of time requirements by the State of Ohio made additional training necessary. In the 1970’s a state Emergency Medical Technician class was required. Later different levels of training were developed to take care of the ever growing need for Emergency Medical needs in the field.

In August 2000 Paramedic Service became a reality in the township. Today the fire department runs two equipped Medic Squads. Both of the departments front line engines are equipped with paramedic equipment , allowing them to respond and provide the highest level of medical care without having to wait for an ambulance to arrive on scene.

Also in 1953, the township purchased a 1000 gallon tanker which was housed at Symmes Corner. A 900 gallon International tanker was donated to the township, which they housed at the Tylersville Road Fire House.

In 1954 Fairfield City broke off from the township and incorporated. With the township losing a fire house to the newly incorporated Fairfield City the need for another fire house was apparent.

Vollies

 

Figure 3 – Company #1 (1955)

 

Thus, in 1954 fire house #3 was built on Reigart Road, exactly five miles from the station on Tylersville Road. It was equipped with the 900 gallon International tanker.

More vollies

 

Figure 4 – Company #3 (1950’s)

 

From the start of the township fire department, firemen were notified of fires by a roof siren being set off at each fire house.

The township contracted a telephone system from Cincinnati Bell Telephone. Fire phones, as they began to be referred as, were placed in a member’s home. Usually it was required that the house could be counted on to answer the phone most of the time. That is why several phones were placed. In addition each fire house had a fire phone.

The houses with phones had a door bell type button installed next to the phone. This button activated the roof sirens at the fire houses. The sirens were old World War Two Air Raid Sirens donated through Civil Defense. 

When the first fireman arrived at the fire house he would call the fire phone and he would be supplied with the address and nature of the call. In turn he would then write the address on a chalk board in the fire house for all other arriving members to see the location of the call. The chalk board was needed because in the early days of volunteer firefighting only a couple firemen could ride on the truck. Most of the firemen drove their personal car to the fires.

In the event the alarm was for a Life Squad the person answering the call would call members of the department that were Life Squad qualified to fill the call. At the very least two members had to make the call. In the event no one was around to take the call, the Butler County Sheriff’s Deputies drove station wagons with ambulance cots in the rear.

The only service they could provide was what we call load and go. No emergency medical attention was applied to the patient.

In 1959 a fire levy was passed and the township purchased a new Cadillac Ambulance equipped with all the modern first aid gear to date. As times changed so did the need for a better method of notifying members of fires and life squad calls.

In the mid 1970’s the township purchased a radio system which replaced the need for roof sirens. Radio desk base stations were installed in the homes that had the fire phones. Each fireman was given a radio receiver (Plectron) that they kept at home. When a call was received tones were sent out over the radio and voice notification was given whether the call was a fire or a call for the life squad.

In the first few months of operation the roof siren still sounded when a fire call was sent out. The chalk board continued use for a short time until all members became familiar with the new system.

In the mid to late 1980’s the plectrons were phased out and replaced with personal pagers that each member carried. The fire phone system eventually became obsolete and the Butler County Sheriff took over the responsibility of dispatching the fire department.

Today the members are required to take shifts manning the fire station so response time is held to a minimum. At night, on large fires, some volunteers still respond from their homes to get back up engines or squads for the runs as needed.

In 1956 a new GMC front mount pumper was purchased by the township for use at fire house #3 on Reigart Road. The need for additional fire equipment was deemed necessary as more houses were built in this area of the township.

In 1964 the membership decided it was time to bring the fire department more up to date. The members approached the township trustees with the idea of purchasing a new modern pumper to meet the needs of a growing community.

However, the township was not in a financial position to purchase such a truck. The members were determined to get a new truck, so the membership got together and decided to give up their run pay to purchase the new pumper. The trustees agreed and a 1964 F.W.D. Pumper was purchased. The truck was a demonstrator that had become available at a good price. This was a huge step forward for firefighting in the township.

More Vollies 3

 

Figure 5 – Company #3 (1960’s)

With nowhere to house the new truck an additional truck bay was added to the Tylersville Road Fire House. The addition was built by members of the department. In the early days of the department, if not for the members doing the work, a lot of what you see today would not exist.
Over the years members of the department donated goods and services to the betterment of the department. Most of the mechanical work done on the trucks and squad was performed by members of the department. They changed the oil as needed and many times paid for the repairs out of their own pocket. Back then all the members had a stake in the township and the need to bond together to provide the best possible service for all the citizens.
The members’ wives were also involved with the operation of the department. They had formed the ladies auxiliary which held fund raisers for the fire department and a lot of time provided much needed food and refreshment to the firemen on large fires. Without the support of the wives a lot of the social and community functions carried out the fire department, would not have ever happened.
As you can see early volunteer fire departments were in essence a family function. As a volunteer, many nights firemen were out all night helping people with flooded basements, downed trees, or any number of other community needs. Not to mention the nights you would be at a fire all night. Many employers back then understood the need for volunteer departments and would excuse employees from work for the day if they had been out all night. Not many employers if any today would be supportive to employees that were also volunteer firefighters.

Even the public view has changed. There used to be a waiting list to get on the department and then even a long wait once you were on to get on the life squad schedule. Volunteer firefighters in this area of the country are becoming far and few in between. It will be a sad state when no one will volunteer to help their neighbor or community without being paid for their services.
Thus I take my hat off to the members of the department in 1964 who gave up their pay so the township could purchase a much needed, new pumper for the community.

Old Station 2

 

Figure 6 – Fire House #2 (1960’s)

 

The fire Department did not have any major changes after purchasing the 1964 FWD Pumper for several years to come. In the mid 1970’s the fire department purchased a new style of life squad. The department started running out of a van style ambulance. Within a year or so, a second van squad was purchased and for the first time the township now had a life squad at each of its stations.

van

 

Figure 7 – Van Style Ambulance

 

Department members now had to take state mandated Emergency Medical Technician Training. This required classroom and practical training at a local hospital. With this training the fire department was better prepared to serve the community’s medical emergencies. In 1978 several members of the department attended paramedic training in Dayton, Ohio. This was done with hopes the township would make the switch to a paramedic unit, but this was not to be realized for at least 20 more years.

This is an example of the hope that members of the department had. They were always looking to improve the service the department could provide and in doing so has kept this fire department on the leading edge of the fire service.

There were many members, with various skills brought to the department. Many times when there was no way to purchase needed materials, these members would make the needed item. For example, in those days farms were still plentiful in the township and surrounding area. One of the members made a nozzle out of a 2 ½ inch coupling and a three foot piece of cast iron pipe. This was used to put out bales of hay on fire. It was not the easiest nozzle to handle but it sure did the job. This is another example of how the members came together to make this a better fire department. This was the volunteer spirit which had always been strong in Fairfield Township.

In early 70’s the fire department held raffles and raised funds to build an addition to the fire house on Tylersville Road. The new addition included a large day room or common area, equipped kitchen, a second restroom, and three offices for fire department use. One of the offices was eventually given to the township police department for use by their officers. This area became a spot for members to gather and socialize. Christmas parties, association meetings, meals, and many other functions took place in the new day room of fire house #1.

 

In 1977, while hosting part of the Butler County Fire School, the fire department had the unthinkable happen. The fire departments’ best front line pumper (1964 FWD) was parked on Milton Street pumping water for a structure fire class.

The driver did everything right and no one ever suspected this could happen. The truck was parked on a steep grade, the brake was set, and the wheels were chocked. During the exercise the chock broke and the parking brake could not hold the weight of the truck. Before anyone could react the truck rolled down Milton Street striking a house at the corner of Milton and Lester. The truck sustained considerable damage. The house was actually knocked off the foundation.

The only saving grace was the truck drove over a cistern and the lid collapsed stopping the truck from going through the house. Even though badly damaged the truck started and pulled away from the house under its own power. The truck was driven back to fire house #1 and taken out of service. It was a frightening moment for the firemen. The township was now protected by two old obsolete trucks.

The FWD was going to need major overhauling to get back in service. The truck was sent to the Seagrave Fire Company in Wisconsin for refitting. The truck came back with a new look. Members rewired the emergency lights, installed a new electronic siren, split the 2½ inch hose bed so dual supply lines could be laid at a fire scene. (This was before 5’ hose became widely used) This truck or engine as we now call them was back in service and was the front line pumper at fire house #1.

Pumper

 

Figure 8 – FWD Pumper (Photo 1980)

 

In that same year the fire department saw the need for a new pumper. The township trustee were approached and presented with the facts and figures of purchasing a new truck. Remember the last truck was purchased in 1964; prices had gone up quite a bit.

Specifications for the new truck were drawn up and the township trustees agreed to accept bids for the purchase of a new fire engine. The bids were reviewed and a bid from the Emergency One Fire Engine Company was accepted. The new truck was delivered in 1978 and housed at the fire house on Reigart Road. The biggest difference in the truck was the color. The truck was painted a bright green. A study had shown that this green color was easier to see.

Many fire departments in the country changed the color of their trucks from the traditional fire red to this new bright green color. Here in Butler County the City of Hamilton and Liberty Township purchased all green trucks. Recently Hamilton changed back to the fire red.

The new truck was of a new design. Most of the body of the truck was made from aluminium. This was not used widely at this time in vehicle construction. The truck made its first response to an explosion at the Egner Trucking Company on Hamilton Middletown Road.

1977 was indeed a busy year for the fire department. The trustees had been meeting in an old school house on Tylersville Road next to fire house #1. The trustees decided that a new administration building was necessary for a growing community. Plans for the building were presented to the board of trustees. The plans included a new police station, township offices, meeting hall, and a new fire station.

The new station would have drive through bays, a kitchen, and a day room. When the new administration/fire house was completed, the old fire house on Reigart Road was closed.

The new fire house at 6032 Morris Road housed the new Emergency One Pumper, the Grass Fire Truck, the 1956 GMC Pumper, and a Life Squad. This move brought more changes to the fire department.

pumper 2

 

Figure 8 – FWD Pumper (Photo 1980)

 

In that same year the fire department saw the need for a new pumper. The township trustee were approached and presented with the facts and figures of purchasing a new truck. Remember the last truck was purchased in 1964; prices had gone up quite a bit.

Specifications for the new truck were drawn up and the township trustees agreed to accept bids for the purchase of a new fire engine. The bids were reviewed and a bid from the Emergency One Fire Engine Company was accepted. The new truck was delivered in 1978 and housed at the fire house on Reigart Road. The biggest difference in the truck was the color. The truck was painted a bright green. A study had shown that this green color was easier to see.

Many fire departments in the country changed the color of their trucks from the traditional fire red to this new bright green color. Here in Butler County the City of Hamilton and Liberty Township purchased all green trucks. Recently Hamilton changed back to the fire red.

The new truck was of a new design. Most of the body of the truck was made from aluminium. This was not used widely at this time in vehicle construction. The truck made its first response to an explosion at the Egner Trucking Company on Hamilton Middletown Road.

1977 was indeed a busy year for the fire department. The trustees had been meeting in an old school house on Tylersville Road next to fire house #1. The trustees decided that a new administration building was necessary for a growing community. Plans for the building were presented to the board of trustees. The plans included a new police station, township offices, meeting hall, and a new fire station.

The new station would have drive through bays, a kitchen, and a day room. When the new administration/fire house was completed, the old fire house on Reigart Road was closed.

The new fire house at 6032 Morris Road housed the new Emergency One Pumper, the Grass Fire Truck, the 1956 GMC Pumper, and a Life Squad. This move brought more changes to the fire department.

grass truck

 

Figure 10 – International Grass Truck

Fire headquarters was established at the Tylersville Road station, and the fire houses were renumbered for the first time since the department started. The new fire house on Morris Road would be called Station One and the fire house on Tylersville Road would be called Station Two.

From this point forward you hardly ever heard anyone refer them as fire houses, in the new generation they became known as stations. With a headquarters established for the first time, better record keeping became available. With the police out of the Tylersville station it gave the department much needed space. The large office was turned into storage/supply room; the other offices were for the Chief’s and officer’s use.

The 70’s brought about much change in the turnout gear that firefighters were wearing. The first major change was in helmet construction. Most departments were using aluminium helmets and had been for years. Many firemen were hurt because the helmet conducted electricity. The heavy rubber coats only gave minimal protection against fire and/or chemical exposure. Through the advances of science plastic was being used in a larger market than ever before. It did not take long for fire equipment companies to realize the advantages of plastic.

Of course not everyone was convinced in the beginning. Like all new products the old timers were set in their ways and it would take a few years to win them over. In 1974 a new low profile helmet was produced, it was OSHA compliant and lightweight. This helmet was the 770 Philadelphian, produced for its name sake, The Philadelphia Fire Department. The Cairns Company produced this helmet. It is only fitting that the helmet was custom made for a department that the founding father of firefighting in America lived, Benjamin Franklin.

The other change in turnout gear was a new style coat. The first was a coat made of a cotton material, and referred as “duck coats”. In the mid 1970’s DuPont developed a new fire resistant material known as Nomex. This material became widely used in fire turnout gear. Most turnouts today have their roots to this discovery in the 70’s.

Another important item in the firefighters gear came into use by this department around 1976. This being the S.C.B.A., or self-contained breathing apparatus. Surprisingly enough the firefighters did not have anything to wear to protect their lungs except a couple old mine style gas masks. This did not give you clean air to breath, only filtered. The first two S.C.B.A. units were carried in a large suitcase type device. These were later mounted in the jump seats on the 1964 FWD.

Though commonly used today in the fire service, these breathing devices were not easily available to most departments. The early S.C.B.A. units were expensive and cost prohibitive to smaller departments.

In 1984 the department set bids for a new fire engine. Nothing like we had ever had before. This new truck would have all the best that fire engines were offering at the time. The members knew they wanted a Sutphen Pumper, just from everything we knew about them they were the best constructed fire engines around.

Plans were drawn up and the township trustees advertised for bids. Several bids were received, but everyone knew the only truck in consideration was the Sutphen. When this engine arrived it was almost a celebration of sorts.

sutphen pumper

 

Figure 11 – 1984 Sutphen Pumper

 

To the members at fire station #2 this was a dream come true. The engine had diesel, automatic transmission, a deck gun, 5’ supply line, and so much more. A fire engine had not brought as much excitement since the firemen purchased the truck in 1964.

In 1986 the members at fire station #2 on Tylersville decided it was time for a change at their station. Ideas were kicked around and it was decided to do a major overhaul of the truck bays.

While the fire chief was at the trustees meeting approaching them with the idea, members at station #2 had already begun demolishing the interior of the bays. By the time the chief returned most of the interior wall separating the two bays laid in a pile of rubble on the station floor. The remodel kept evolving as construction continued. Eventually the ceiling was removed and the new ceiling was raised higher which allowed for better lighting in the truck bays. The floors were torn up and a new concrete floor was poured.

The station was repainted, rewired, new bay doors, and all the work was performed by the members of fire station #2. This station stands today showing what can happen when the traditional volunteer spirit is brought out. This rivaled the earlier members giving up pay so the township could have a new pumper.

 

In 1986 while returning from an auto accident William Gray was at the wheel and Darrell Murrell was riding in the officer’s seat. On Hamilton Mason Road just west of Morris Road Mr. Gray suffered a heart attack and lost control of the fire engine. The engine went off the south side of the road into a ravine. The force of the impact threw Darrell into the dash breaking one of his legs. Bill who was at the wheel was killed in the accident.

This became the darkest day in the history of the Fairfield Township Fire Department. Never before had a firefighter been killed in the line of duty. Mr. William Gray was buried with full honors. A memorial stands today in his honor at fire station #2. It contains his helmet, coat, boots, and pager. As well as the bell off the 1947 International pumper.

In 1997 the township trustees sent out for bids to purchase a new pumper. The fire department drew up specifications and bids were received on the new pumper. The township purchased a new Sutphen pumper. This truck like others in the past carried all the latest technology and best design of modern fire engines. This truck was placed in service at Station #2 on Tylersville Road. Today, this truck is the first out engine from Station #2.

1984 sutphen

 

Figure 12 – 1997 Sutphen

 

Fairfield Township saw a large amount of residential building in the 90’s. The fire department saw a need for a new fire station and headquarters building. The township Trustees were approached and presented with the idea of a new fire station and headquarters building. The township set aside land beside the present township Administration building.

In 2000, a new fire station was built, which houses fire station #1 and the fire department headquarters. The building was like nothing the fire department had ever seen before. It contained offices for the fire department administration, training room, sleeping quarters, drive thru bays, and room for future expansion.

Today this station is home to the Fire Chief, Assistant Fire Chief, Station officers, and more. This building was a dream come true for the members of the department.

1994 brought about political events which forced the trustees to seek changing the status of the township into a new city. Recent changes in state law made it possible for a township to change from a township form of government into a city form of government. The board of trustees filed the necessary paperwork with Butler County thus forming the City of Indian Springs. The trustees sought this change in an attempt to protect our borders from annexation.

But the change was challenged in court and the township was forced to return to township status, but not before getting the approval from the cities surrounding us. In order to return to township status a portion of township land was incorporated into the City of Hamilton.

 

When the department started hiring part time firefighter/paramedics for daytime coverage it became apparent that the department needed to have leadership in place to provide firefighter assignments, supervise employees, and provide structure for the department. It was decided that the position of Assistant Fire Chief would become a full time position.

Assistant Chief Paul McKendry was the first full time employee of the Fire Department. He was hired on June 5, 2000, Paul was a volunteer Assistant Fire Chief for Fairfield Township before becoming full time. 

In 2002, the fire department sought to purchase a ladder or tower fire truck. This truck like all others was put out for bids by the board of trustees. The department purchased a 2002 Sutphen 75’ Tower. This truck was designated Quint 11 and housed at station #1 on Morris Road.

fire engine

 

Figure 13 – 2002 Sutphen Quint

 

The Fairfield Township Fire Department has seen many changes from the first formation in 1947. This fire department has always been innovative and progressive.

On July 31, 2006 Fire Chief David Downie became Fairfield Townships first full time Fire Chief. Now with a full time fire chief at the helm the township can count on a professional and community oriented fire department for many years to come.

In 2007, the fire department celebrated 60 years of service to the citizens of Fairfield Township. This brings with it a sense of pride with it. This is one of the oldest volunteer fire departments in the county, if not the oldest.

Volunteer departments are very different from Career fire departments. Career department consist of full time paid employees. Volunteer departments consist of your neighbour’s, your friends; people all coming together to provide a necessary service to the community.

When the alarm sounds volunteers drop what they are doing and become fire fighters. Volunteers come from many different backgrounds. It can be a mix of white collar, blue collar, self-employed, or just about any type of job or employment. But when the alarm sounds they all come together for a common cause, as old as the United States.

Volunteer fire departments date back to Benjamin Franklin at the founding of our country. Helping their neighbour’s is the volunteer spirit.

It has been said, why do fire fighters run into a burning building when everyone else is running out, the reason is to help your fellow man. Volunteers have a connection to the community they serve and the residents who are their friends and neighbours. As the number of calls has increased so did the challenge to remain a volunteer department.

In order to provide the necessary services and response to our community the department has transitioned into a staffed department. As our ability to respond was impacted by the availability of volunteers the department moved to a part time staffing operation. This allowed the department to assure that we were able to respond to calls.

The Township realized that this change also created a need for some level of supervision and a full time Assistant Fire Chief position was created, and eventually a Full Time Fire Chief and a Training Captain were added to the full time staff.

The addition of part-time staffing and the addition of limited full time staffing have allowed the department to continue to provide the highest quality service to our community.

As both the type and number of calls continues to increase, we continue to prepare for the evolution of the department and changes to our staffing levels. We have worked hard to maintain our facilities and equipment. In 2013 the department will accepted delivery of both a new EMS unit as well as a new fire engine.

2013 Chevy Medic

2013 Chevy 4500 Horton Ambulance

The department has been working towards the replacement of the Tylersville Road station since 2009. In 2018 the Board of Trustees has taken steps to move this project forward.

2012 Sutphen

2012 Sutphen Pumper

 

2017 horton medic

2017 F550 Horton Ambulance

2012 tracker boat

2012 Tracker Grizzly

Even as the fire department here in Fairfield Township continues to evolve based on meeting the ever-changing needs of the community, we are moving into addressing the staffing needs of the community.

The department has continued the replacement of our equipment helping to ensure we can provide the best possible response.

In 2016 we added a 2012 Tracker Boat to the fleet. Improving our water rescue capabilities.

GMC 3500

In 2017 two utility vehicles were added to the fleet.

2016 GMC 3500

2016 F250

  2016 F250

Tylersville Station

In Service from 1948 - 2019

2019 will be remembered for the opening of the NEW Station 212. The Township built a replacement station for the Tylersville Road Building. The Tylersville Road facility had served the Township well for many years. The changes in the Department resulted in the need for an updated facility. The NEW Station 212 is located at 6911 Gilmore Road, between Hamilton Mason and Princeton Road. The new building has been designed to support future growth as well as house the new larger apparatus of today’s Fire Service.

The new building has expanded crew quarters designed to house up to 10 personnel with expanded kitchen and dayroom areas. The bays are able to house any of our current equipment and have been sized to support future equipment which seems to grow in size with each passing year.

We hope that this new building will serve the community as well as the old station has.

new 212 signage
bays new 212

Dedicated May 11, 2019

The current members and past members can take pride in the service this department has provided over the last 60 years. The hard work and dedication of all if the members both past and present have helped to make the Fire Department what it is today

This is dedicated to all the men and women who have served The Fairfield Township fire department

new 212